Video LectureHereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer and Genetic Testing

In this video lecture Dr. Mao will explain hereditary breast cancer, testing and what can be done if a risk is detected. Dr. McMillin with discuss germline pharmacogenetic testing and how this line of testing can assist with the treatment of breast cancer.

Originally presented on November 20, 2015 in Salt Lake City, Utah.



Lecture Presenters

Rong Mao, MD

Rong Mao, MD

Medical Director, Molecular Genetics and Genomics Laboratories
ARUP Laboratories
Co-Director, Clinical Medical Genetics Fellowship Program
University of Utah School of Medicine
Associate Professor of Pathology
University of Utah School of Medicine

Dr. Mao is an associate professor of pathology and co-director of the Clinical Medical Genetics Fellowship Program at the University of Utah School of Medicine. Dr. Mao received her MD from Capital University of Medicine in Beijing, China and her MS in molecular pathology from Beijing Union Medical College. She is certified by the American Board of Medical Genetics, with a subspecialty in clinical molecular genetics, and by the New York State Department of Health, with a subspecialty in genetic testing.



Gwendolyn A. McMillin, PhD

Gwendolyn A. McMillin, PhD

Medical Director, Toxicology Laboratory
ARUP Laboratories
Co-Medical Director, Pharmacogenetics
ARUP Laboratories
Professor of Pathology
University of Utah School of Medicine

Dr. McMillin is a professor of pathology at the University of Utah School of Medicine. She received her PhD in pharmacology and toxicology from the University of Utah and is certified by the American Board of Clinical Chemistry in clinical chemistry and toxicological chemistry.



Objectives

After this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Learn how breast cancer mutations are inherited and who should be tested for hereditary breast cancer.
  • Learn that there are mutations that can change the way that drugs work in the human body and how they can affect treatment.

Sponsored by:

University of Utah School of Medicine, Department of Pathology, and ARUP Laboratories