Video LectureARCHIVED: NOT AVAILABLE FOR CREDIT
Cytogenetic and Molecular Diagnosis in Gestational Disorders

New technology has introduced new options and new testing algorithms for the detection of genetic abnormalities in the prenatal setting and in cases of pregnancy loss. This presentation covers current strategies for both prenatal genetic testing and genetic testing on pregnancy loss samples, with a special section on molar pregnancy detection and classification.

Originally presented on February 5, 2013 in Park City, Utah.



Lecture Presenter

Katherine Geiersbach, MD, FCAP, FACMG

Katherine Geiersbach, MD, FCAP, FACMG

Medical Director, Cytogenetics Laboratory
ARUP Laboratories
Medical Director, Genomic Microarray Laboratory
ARUP Laboratories
Medical Director, Molecular Oncology Laboratory
ARUP Laboratories
Assistant Professor of Pathology
University of Utah School of Medicine

Dr. Geiersbach is the medical director of the Cytogenetics, Genomic Microarray, and Molecular Oncology laboratories at ARUP and an assistant professor of pathology at the University of Utah School of Medicine. Dr. Geiersbach received her MD from the University of Colorado School of Medicine and completed her residency in pathology at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center. She is certified by the American Board of Pathology in anatomic and clinical pathology, with subspecialty certification in molecular genetic pathology and clinical cytogenetics. She is a fellow of the College of American Pathologists and the American College of Medical Genetics. Her research interests include DNA-based genotyping of molar pregnancy, cytogenetic abnormalities in spontaneous pregnancy loss, and genetic abnormalities in cancer.



Objectives

After this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss the role of molecular genetic testing in evaluating pathologic conditions related to viable and non-viable pregnancies.
  • Review laboratory testing strategies for detection of genetic abnormalities in viable and non-viable pregnancies.

Sponsored by:

University of Utah School of Medicine, and ARUP Laboratories