Video Lectures

The video lectures below are provided as an educational opportunity and resource for laboratory professionals. “Current video lectures” provide FREE continuing education credits upon the completion of a quiz which is provided after the video is viewed in its entirety. The quiz must be passed with a score of 80 percent or higher to obtain credit.

Credit Types Available: (click icon to filter)
C = CME |  S = SAM |  P = P.A.C.E. |  F = Florida | Show All |


Video Lecture Credit Types
CRISPR and Diagnostics: Challenges and Strategies for Understanding Results from Sequencing including Variants of Unknown Significance by Joshua L. Bonkowsky, MD, PhD
Number of Credits: 1.0

Diagnosis of disease has been revolutionized by next-generation sequencing (NGS) tools, but their use presents challenges to the clinician and to the laboratory. We discuss rationale approaches to diagnosis based on data; the use of exome, whole genome, and gene panel testing; and the hurdles created by identification of novel genes, mutations, and variants of unknown significance (VUS). Finally, we present and discuss the use of CRISPR, other novel technologies, and available resources, that can address the avalanche of data from NGS.

C S P F
Help! What do I do with those Granulomas in the Lung? by Henry D. Tazelaar, MD
Number of Credits: 1.0

Granulomatous lung disease is a common problem in surgical pathology and the differential is broad. When stains and cultures are negative, one needs an approach to guide clinical decision making. The lecture will highlight a practical, proven approach to interpreting large and small granulomas in a way that will be most helpful to your clinicians and patients.

C S P F
Big Data: Genomic Reference Databases to Empower Mendelian Diagnosis by Anne O’Donnell-Luria, MD, PhD
Number of Credits: 1.0

This presentation will discuss how large scale reference population databases have improved molecular diagnoses and variant interpretation. By evaluating where variation is missing from the general population, candidate disease genes constrained for loss of function and missense variation have been identified. We have developed a frequency filtering approach to determine when a variant is to common in the general population to cause a given disease.

C S P F
Appendiceal GCC and LAMN: Navigating the Alphabet Soup in the Appendix by Sanjay Kakar, MD
Number of Credits: CME/SAM: 0.75 PACE: 0.5

Discuss the terminology, morphologic criteria, staging schemes and common pitfalls in the diagnosis and treatment of appendiceal mucinous tumors and goblet cell tumors.

C S P F
Staging Updates in AJCC 8th ed Colorectal and Selected GI Sites by Sanjay Kakar, MD
Number of Credits: 1.0

Commonly encountered problems in the staging of colorectal and hepatobiliary cancers will be discussed with a focus on rationale for changes in the AJCC 8th edition and new parameters in the CAP synoptics.

C S P F
Case Studies in Lab Acquisitions—The Impact on Clinical and Lab Operations by Brian R. Jackson, MD, MS; Ladonna Bradley, MT(ASCP); and Steven Serota
Number of Credits: 1.0

This panel discussion will cover some different outsourcing arrangements offered by commercial laboratories, focusing specifically on the impacts to laboratory personnel, clinician satisfaction, and patient care.

This video lecture is part three of a three-part series entitled "Don't Sell Your Lab Short."




C S P F
A Business Perspective of Laboratory Outsourcing Arrangements by Golden Welch, BS, MT(ASCP) and Sandy Richman, MBA, C(ASCP)
Number of Credits: 1.0

Outsourcing laboratory services can produce short-term cost savings with long-term consequences. This presentation will describe economic and other factors that drive outsourcing arrangements, as well as economic and operational risks. Presenters will also discuss ways to articulate the value of the laboratory to administrators and executives.

This video lecture is part two of a three-part series entitled "Don't Sell Your Lab Short."




C S P F
How to Make Smart Insourcing and Outsourcing Decisions for Hospital Laboratory Services by Brian R. Jackson, MD, MS
Number of Credits: 1.0

Does your lab currently obtain tests or other services from an outside vendor that could potentially be insourced? Or has your lab or hospital considered outsourcing some or all lab services to an outside company? These types of decisions are extremely common throughout healthcare, and they’re often driven by top-down financial analyses, which, in some cases, leads to disastrous outcomes. This presentation will provide examples from healthcare and other industries to show how a more holistic approach to cost analysis can lead to better insourcing and outsourcing decisions.

This video lecture is part one of a three-part series entitled "Don't Sell Your Lab Short."




C S P F
Ordering the Right Lab Test: It all begins with the Right Test Name by Ila Singh, MD, PhD
Number of Credits: 1.0

Names for lab tests have traditionally been chosen by clinical pathologists and scientists. While these test names make perfect sense to anyone in the clinical laboratories, that is not always the case with clinicians. Clinicians often order the wrong test or a sub-optimal test, or more tests than necessary, because the relevant test names are unclear or obscure. Often the wrong orders lead to safety and quality issues. Many hospital Utilization Management (UM) or Lab Stewardship efforts focus on correcting such test names, which is typically a slow and non-trivial process, as no standardized lab names exist.

This talk will discuss solutions to non-standard lab names, namely, TRUU-Lab, a collaborative effort among pathologists, clinicians, professional organizations, accreditation agencies, large reference labs and terminology groups to create a consensus guideline for giving laboratory test more rational and consistent names. The ultimate goal is to bring this consistency and ease of use into electronic health records (EHR) and laboratory information systems (LIS).

C S P F
Fatty Liver Disease: Diagnostic Challenges and Updates by Ryan M. Gill, MD, PhD
Number of Credits: 1.0

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) indicates evidence of fat in the liver, either by imaging or histology, in a patient without a reason to have secondary fat accumulation (e.g. significant alcohol consumption, use of certain medications, or inherited storage defects, etc). Histologic examination of liver tissue is required to sub-classify NAFLD as non-alcoholic fatty liver (NAFL) or non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). NAFL represents steatosis without histologic liver injury while NASH represents steatosis with histologic evidence of liver injury (i.e. ballooned hepatocytes, inflammation, and fibrosis).

Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) key pathologic features:

  • Steatosis >5%
  • Inflammation (lobular)
  • Hepatocellular injury (ballooned hepatocytes)

The risk of progression to advanced fibrosis in NAFL is minimal while in NASH, progression to cirrhosis and/or development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is well described. NASH cirrhosis is defined as cirrhosis with current or previous evidence of NAFLD. Risk factors for NASH include metabolic syndrome, dyslipidemia, diabetes mellitus type 2, and obesity. There are no clinical or radiological tests that can reliably diagnose steatohepatitis and serum transaminases often correlate poorly with biopsy findings. Histologic diagnosis remains the gold standard for diagnosis of NASH. It is important to recognize diagnostic pitfalls in evaluating NAFLD biopsies and to appreciate the role of scoring systems used in clinical trials.

C S P F
Dysplasia of the Gastrointestinal Tract: Pitfalls and Solutions by Mary Bronner, MD
Number of Credits: CME/SAM: 1.25 PACE: 1.0 Florida: 1.3

This presentation will cover dysplasia arising in chronic inflammatory disorders of the gastrointestinal tract, including Barrett’s esophagus, idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease IIIBD), pangastric intestinalized Helicobacter pylori gastritis. Covered topics will include the intestinal and gastric types of Barrett’s dysplasia, dysplasia grading, pitfalls for over diagnosing and over grading dysplasia, broadening therapies for Barrett’s neoplasia and the impact of this on pathology practice, the split muscularis mucosae in Barrett’s, the problems with dysplasia diagnosis, in differences between Barrett’s and IBD neoplasia, visible lesions in IIBD dysplasia, natural history data on dysplasia, improved biomarkers of cancer risk, adequate surveillance biopsies, and treatment options. If time permits, the diagnosis and management of colorectal adenocarcinoma in polypectomy specimens will be reviewed.

C S P F
Rapid Sequencing of Known Mendelian Genes in NICU by Rong Mao, MD, FACMG
Number of Credits: 1.0

A significant fraction of the 4,000 known single-gene disorders manifest symptoms in newborns. A rapid diagnosis of newborn diseases could make the difference between life and death, as well as reduce length of stay in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). A targeted panel of ~4,900 known disease-causing genes has been developed with a short turnaround time and a focused interpretation. This panel combines genetics etiology with phenotype to provide a comprehensive clinical understanding of disease in NICU.

C S P F
Adventures in Laboratory Stewardship: Improving Quality and Care while Lowering Costs by Gary W. Procop, MD, MS
Number of Credits: 1.0

This session will discuss many of the interventions undertaken by the speaker at his institution to improve care delivery through laboratory stewardship interventions. Emphasis will be placed on laboratory leadership, collaboration with clinical colleagues, the importance of communication and professionalism, and a systems-based approach to problem solving. Evidence will be presented that these interventions, in addition to promoting healthcare affordability, directly improve the quality of healthcare delivered, as outlined by the Institute of Medicine.

C S P F
All in the Family: How Genetic Counselors Facilitate Familial Genetic Testing by Amanda Openshaw, MS, LCGC
Number of Credits: 0.5

This lecture provides an introduction to familial genetic testing, meant for non-genetics providers and other healthcare professionals. Standard genetics methodologies are reviewed, and considerations for streamlining test selection and ordering are discussed.

C S P F
Laboratory Ergonomics Programs by Christina K. Kulakowski
Number of Credits: 1.0

Having a strong ergonomics program can help decrease workers compensation claims and improve employee’s performance. This workshop will focus on what ergonomics is and why it is an important element of a comprehensive occupational health and safety program.

We will review proper workstation setup, as well as laboratory ergonomic work practices and principals with a focus on repetitive tasks such as microscope use, pipetting, and miscellaneous hand tool and computer use. Additionally, we will identify what to include in an ergonomics program—from effective training to ergonomic assessments and everything in between.

Additionally, we will discuss specific laboratory case studies and work through problem-solving exercises to identify risk factors in a laboratory setting and how to mitigate the identified risk.

C S P F
Updates in Pancreas by Kajsa Affolter, MD
Number of Credits: 1.0

We will discuss the modifications to the AJCC Cancer Staging Manual 8th edition with regard to both the T and N categories of pancreatic adenocarcinoma, focusing on the reasons for changes and the practical implications. Furthermore, the slight alteration to the classification of neuroendocrine neoplasms in the AJCC Cancer Staging Manual 8th edition will be addressed, with an emphasis on how this impacts the clinical management and prognosis. We will conclude with a brief conversation of various pancreatic cysts and recent suggestions on the best classification system.

C S P F
Understanding Quality Control: A Process Improvement Perspective by Robert Schmidt, MD, PhD, MBA and Lauren N. Pearson, DO, MPH
Number of Credits: CME/SAM: 1.25 PACE: 1.0 Florida: 1.3

This session will provide an understanding of three fundamental concepts of quality control: stability, capability and controllability. The theory of each of these concepts will be described and will be followed with practical advice on how to apply these concepts in the real world. A top level approach to quality improvement will be presented along with practical tools to implement each phase of the quality improvement process. The goal is to provide participants with a practical approach to QC analysis and a roadmap for QC improvement.

C S P F
The End: Challenges in Anal Pathology by Eric A. Swanson, MD
Number of Credits: CME/SAM: 0.75 PACE: 0.5

Discussion of challenges in the diagnosis of anorectal malignancies. Evaluation of the histologic and immunophenotypic findings in various malignant lesions is discussed. The impact of the diagnosis of the various lesions is discussed, with emphasis on the treatment and prognostic implications.

C S P F
Genomic Profiling and New Immunotherapies: An Oncologist’s Perspective by Jonathan Whisenant, MD
Number of Credits: 1.0

The purpose of this lecture is to give pathologists a clinical perspective on how oncologists use molecular testing and biomarkers for therapeutic implications. A review of several trials focuses on tests and therapies that have been FDA approved or appear promising for future approval.

C S P F
Updates in Mastocytosis by Tracy I. George, MD
Number of Credits: CME/SAM: 0.75 PACE: 0.5

In “Updates in Mastocytosis,” Dr. Tracy George discusses the diagnosis, classification, and recent clinical trials work in mast cell disease. This orphan disease has been of intense interest recently with breakthrough therapies based on targeting of the D816V KIT mutation, approved by the FDA and EMA. Dr. George is an international expert in the pathology of mast cell diseases and a founding member of AIM (American Initiatives in Mast Cell Diseases). The inaugural meeting of AIM will occur at Stanford University in May 2019.

C S P F
Tough Love: Managing Your Lab Customers to Improve Relationships and Outcomes by Brian Jackson, MD, MS
Number of Credits: 0.5

How should laboratories treat their clinician customers? On one hand, laboratories want to provide excellent customer service by accommodating their clinical customers’ preferences. On the other hand, laboratories need to enforce standardized processes such as proper specimen submission. This pre-recorded webinar will provide examples from other industries to illustrate how a “tough love” approach can produce high levels of process quality and clinician loyalty at the same time.

C S P F
Genomics Reimagined in a Reference Laboratory Setting by Hunter Best, PhD, FACMG
Number of Credits: 1.0

The field of genomics has evolved at a rapid pace, resulting in many growing pains for clinical laboratories trying to implement massively parallel sequencing-based testing. This presentation will discuss the issues that we have encountered in this area, and how we have modified our processes to address them.

C S P F
Automation and Process Re-Engineering are Required to Achieve Six-Sigma Quality: Our 27-Year History of Continuous Improvement by Charles D. Hawker, PhD, MBA, FACSc, FAACC
Number of Credits: 1.0

This lecture reviews the progress of ARUP Laboratories over a 27 year period to improve the incidence of lost specimens. This effort culminated in reaching Six-Sigma quality, making ARUP the first US clinical lab to achieve this level for any metric, whether analytical or non-analytical. A combination of eight automation stages and 19 process improvement/ engineering control steps enabled this improvement.

C S P F
The Scoop on Biological Testing for Detecting or Confirming Drug-Exposed Newborns - What, When and How? by Gwen McMillin, PhD, DABCC(CC,TC)
Number of Credits: 1.0

Drug use during pregnancy is associated with acute and chronic medical needs for the associated newborn, including management of neonatal abstinence syndrome. This presentation reviews drug use patterns among pregnant women in the United States and options for biological testing to detect drug-exposed newborns. Strengths, challenges, and interpretive tools are discussed with emphasis on meconium and umbilical cord tissue, two newborn specimens that are widely used today.

C S P F
Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Histologic Variants by Sanjay Kakar, MD
Number of Credits: 1.0

Discuss the morphologic features of histologic variants of HCC and combined hepatocellular-cholangiocarcinoma with a focus on advantages and pitfalls of various immunohistochemical markers in recognizing the subtypes. The importance of novel markers including molecular alterations in improving the diagnosis will be discussed.

C S P F
Barrett’s Esophagus in 2018: The Pathologist's Perspective by John Hart, MD
Number of Credits: 1.0

In recent years there has been several changes suggested for the operational diagnosis of Barrett esophagus. In addition, new endoscopic techniques for the detection and management of Barrett esophagus are becoming increasingly utilized in routine clinical practice. These new developments, which have important implications for the practicing surgical pathologist, will be discussed in detail.

C S P F
Deconvoluting the Most Clinically Relevant Region of the Human Genome by Dimitri S. Monos, PhD
Number of Credits: 1.0

The MHC, a segment of 4Mb, is recognized to be the genomic region in the Human Genome associated with the highest number of diseases. Its significance calls for its detailed and thorough characterization. Our recent attempts to characterize the 4Mb of the MHC for heterozygote samples using long sequencing reads (3-10kb) and de novo (not reference-based) assembly is presented. Our eventual objective is the generation of MHC haplotypes, if possible for the whole MHC or any other sizeable sub-segment of interest. Most recently, within the MHC we have identified genomic elements, (like miRNAs) playing important biological role by controlling the expression of many other genes in the cell. Through computational means we have identified a likely large number of miRNAs encoded by the MHC. Could the presence of these elements explain the high density of SNPs, within the MHC, associated with many diseases? Alternative approaches combining NGS/Genetics and Complexity Theory/Physics provide new insights in the relationships of the different genomic sequences (exons/introns/intergenic sequences) and suggest that these sequences encode for elements forming a continuum of information throughout the MHC. We are in the process of identifying both the information and the interactive relationships of the different subsegments of the MHC.

C S P F
Patient Blood Management: At the Forefront of Quality and Value in Healthcare by Ryan A. Metcalf, MD, CQA(ASQ)
Number of Credits: 1.0

Blood transfusion is the most commonly performed procedure in the United States, is often overperformed, and Patient Blood Management (PBM) is now considered standard of care. Per capita health care costs in the United States are double those of many other high-income countries without better outcomes. PBM creates value by simultaneously improving patient outcomes, reducing costs, and improving efficiency. This PBM presentation is in three parts: reducing unnecessary transfusions, comprehensive PBM, and the effective use of data now and in the future.

C S P F
Ethics, Stewardship, and Laboratory Tests with Unproven Clinical Benefit by Brian Jackson, MD, MS
Number of Credits: 1.0

Clinical laboratories often receive orders for tests that are outside the mainstream of clinical testing. Some of these are new/emerging tests for which there simply isn’t a lot of clinical experience. Some are research biomarkers that are primarily of interest to bench scientists. Some are panels or algorithms designed largely in response to marketing considerations. What these all have in common is a lack of clinical evidence demonstrating clinical utility, i.e. therapeutic benefit for patients as a consequence of the tests. How should clinical labs evaluate requests for such tests? Historically many laboratories have approached these requests from a financial and/or logistical perspective, approving the tests as long as they don’t overly burden the local laboratory (and provided that they are performed in a CLIA-licensed setting). This presentation will present an additional framework for consideration, namely bioethics. What is the ethical impact of such testing on the individual patient as well as on society as a whole? And how can potentially useful – but still unproven – laboratory tests be introduced into clinical settings in an ethically consistent manner?

Originally presented on July 10, 2018 as a live Seattle Children's Hospital Webinar Series

C S P F
Clinical Cytogenetic Testing: Applications in Constitutional and Oncology Settings by Erica F. Andersen, PhD, FACMG
Number of Credits: 1.0

Cytogenetic testing is utilized across multiple areas of medicine for the diagnosis of heritable (constitutional) genetic conditions, as well as in cancer, particularly hematologic disease. This presentation will provide an overview on the utility of clinical cytogenetic testing for patients with developmental constitutional disorders, prenatal and perinatal diagnosis, pregnancy loss, and in cancer.

C S P F
Assessing Laboratory Performance for Next Generation Sequencing Based Detection of Germline Variants through Proficiency Testing by Karl V. Voelkerding, MD, FCAP
Number of Credits: 1.0

Participation in proficiency testing (PT) is a required external quality assurance activity for laboratories that are CLIA certified. The College of American Pathologists (CAP) provides a diversity of PT programs administered globally. This presentation will focus on the development and implementation of two PT programs by CAP for laboratories utilizing next generation sequencing (NGS) based diagnostic assays for the detection of germline variants. The first program uses DNA samples and is designed as a method-based PT to assess a laboratory’s total analytical NGS processes. The second program, new and designed for laboratories performing exome sequencing for undiagnosed disorders, uses an in silico sequence data file approach to assess laboratory bioinformatics and causative variant identification processes. The elements of these two programs, along with laboratory results from the method-based PT program, will be presented.

C S P F
Challenging Cases in Medical Liver Disease by John Hart, MD
Number of Credits: 1.0

Medical liver diseases can present numerous diagnostic dilemmas for the surgical pathologist, as there is a limited spectrum of histologic changes and considerable morphologic overlap among disease states. An approach to medical liver disease diagnosis will be presented that utilizes pattern recognition in combination with interpretation of key laboratory data and elements of the available clinical history to arrive at a final diagnosis, or at least a limited differential that is of value to clinicians.

C S P F
Multiple Sclerosis: Clinical Features & Laboratory Evaluation by Nicole E. Stanley, MD
Number of Credits: 0.5

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a common neurologic disorder and one of the most common CNS causes of disability in young adults. It is a chronic, immune-mediated demyelinating disorder affecting neurons of the central nervous system. Symptoms are often nonspecific, and patients’ clinical courses can vary widely. This presentation provides an overview of the pathophysiology and risk factors for MS, the clinical, radiologic, and laboratory diagnostic processes, and the management of patients with MS.

C S P F
Screening for Inborn Errors of Metabolism Using Untargeted Metabolomic Profiling by V. Reid Sutton, MD
Number of Credits: 1.0

Metabolomics is used to measure small biochemical compounds in biological fluids and provides a comprehensive picture of perturbations in metabolic pathways. Untargeted metabolic profiling using mass spectrometry has the potential to enhance the detection of inborn errors of metabolism (IEM). This presentation describes the analysis of metabolic patterns in clinical specimens to assist in diagnosis of rare disorders.

C S P F
Introduction to the ABO Blood Group by Justin R. Rhees, MS, MLS(ASCP)CM, SBBCM
Number of Credits: 1.0

The ABO blood group system is the most important in transfusion medicine. This presentation covers basic ABO inheritance, antigen production and expression, and weak subgroups.

C S P F
Overview of the AACC 2018 Laboratory Medicine Practice Guideline – Using Clinical Laboratory Tests to Monitor Drug Therapy in Pain Management Patients by Gwendolyn A. McMillin, PhD
Number of Credits: 1.0

Clinical laboratories are now routinely engaged in the urine drug testing performed to assure adherence to therapy in chronic pain management patients, particularly when opioids are prescribed. This type of testing is unique from traditional workplace drug testing and emergency toxicology yet no practice guidelines have been available… until now! The AACC Academy has recently published the first laboratory medicine practice guidelines for monitoring adherence to therapy in chronic pain management patients. This presentation will describe the process for authoring the guidance document, as well as review the 26 evidence-based recommendations and 7 consensus-based expert opinions, emphasizing how laboratories can promote appropriate utilization and practices.

C S P F
Laboratory Stewardship: Taking the First Steps to Downstream Savings by Andrew Fletcher, MD, CPE
Number of Credits: 1.0

This presentation will delve into the concept of lab stewardship and its critical role for the future of laboratory medicine. Dr. Fletcher will also outline several strategies for implementing successful interventions to drive downstream savings in healthcare systems.

C S P F
Evidence-Based Immunohistochemical Panels for the Diagnosis of Hepatocellular Neoplasms by Sanjay Kakar, MD
Number of Credits: 1.0

Discussion of challenges in the diagnosis of focal nodular hyperplasia, hepatocellular adenoma and well-differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma. Interpretation of different clinical scenarios will be addressed with an emphasis on implications of the diagnosis on patient management. The subtyping of hepatocellular adenoma and the significance of beta-catenin activation will be discussed.

C S P F
Mystery Illnesses: Developing a Path to Caring and Discovery by Rong Mao, MD, FACMG and Lorenzo D. Botto, MD
Number of Credits: 1.0

Rare and undiagnosed diseases are increasingly a recognized priority for health and research. Of the estimated 7000 known rare diseases, only a fraction have their molecular and mechanistic bases delineated. These conditions have a disproportionate impact on families and health care costs. They also represent a unique opportunity for discovery of the biologic bases of disease and potential drug targets. To address these challenges, the University of Utah has developed the Penelope Program, a combined clinical and research program that integrates team-based cognitive expertise with advanced genetic testing to optimize the path to care and discovery. We will describe the program’s approach and results to date, with a focus on the spectrum of rare or new conditions discovered so far, and the implications for clinical management and translational research.

C S P F
Introduction to Cytogenetics by Erica F. Andersen, PhD, FACMG
Number of Credits: 1.0

This lecture is an introduction to the science of cytogenetics. Cytogenetics is the study of chromosomes, genomic structure, function and variation, and the role of these aspects in human disease and heredity. Explanations will include the basics of technologies of chromosome analysis and karyotyping.

C S P F
Implementing Clinical Whole Exome Sequencing for the Care of Children with Mendelian Disorders and Cancer by Sharon E. Plon, MD, PhD, FACMG
Number of Credits: 1.0

Whole exome sequencing (WES) is utilized for the clinical care of children with Mendelian disorders and cancer. This presentation reviews experiences and current implementation of WES across clinical contexts including the newborn ICU and pediatric oncology.

C S P F
HIV Update in Laboratory Testing by Patricia R. Slev, PhD
Number of Credits: 1.0

New recommendations for laboratory diagnostic testing for HIV were officially published by the CDC in June 2014. Understanding appropriate test utilization and result interpretation for HIV diagnosis is critical for compliance and patient care. This presentation will address the new algorithm and review the evidence and rationale in support of the new guidelines.

Originally presented on January 30, 2015 and updated on September 6, 2017 in Salt Lake City, Utah

C S P F
Star Wars of the Body Besieged: A Review of Immunology and Immunodeficiency by Harry R. Hill, MD
Number of Credits: 1.0

Dr. Hill relates the major portions of the body's host defense system to the military's Star Wars that protects us from external and internal invaders. He describes the laboratory assays utilized to assess each portion of the immune and inflammatory system. Lastly, he shows individual patients he has seen over the past 40 years in his Clinical Immunology/Immunodeficiency Clinic at University of Utah which illustrate the various immune defects and the infections they suffer. He presents this in a manner so one can understand this complex system, know how to evaluate it and use in the clinical laboratory to help these seriously affected patients.

C S P F
Novel Approaches to ID Testing Using NGS-Based Metagenomics by Robert Schlaberg, MD, Dr Med, MPH
Number of Credits: 1.0

Metagenomics, the genomic analysis of a population of microbes, enables the profiling of microbial communities in the environment and the human body at unprecedented depth and breadth. Its application in the diagnosis of infectious disease is enabling the rapid and accurate detection of thousands of pathogens in patient samples without the need for clinicians to suspect the likely cause and order the right test. This lecture discusses approaches, promises, and challenges for the use of metagenomics-based testing in the diagnosis and management of infectious syndromes.

C S P F
Pancreatic EUS-FNA: Current Topics and Helpful Hints by Benjamin L. Witt, MD and Douglas G. Adler, MD
Number of Credits: 1.5

The course will focus on emerging trends in EUS-FNA of the pancreas including the emergence of novel needle types and the potential impact of rapid on site evaluation. A case-based approach will be used to highlight some of the potential pitfalls in both solid and cystic lesions of the pancreas. The lecture will include both a cytopathologist and clinician perspective on performing, reporting, and management of pancreatic EUS-FNAs.

C S P F
Interesting Cases in Gynecologic Pathology by Michael Ward, MD
Number of Credits: CME/SAM: 0.75 PACE: 0.5

This is a one hour presentation of four interesting and challenging neoplastic GYN cases seen at the University of Utah and which have been seen in consultation by experts in GYN pathology at Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA. Cases include unique presentations of common entities as well as more distinct tumors, and a discussion of the diagnostic features, differential diagnosis, and potential pitfalls for each.

C S P F
Kidney Stones: Diagnosis, Treatment, & Future Prevention by Jessica Corean, MD
Number of Credits: 1.0

Kidney stones are a common medical issue, affecting 1 in 11 people during their lifetime. Stones form when normally soluble material supersaturates in the urine and begins to crystalize. Management is dependent on stone size, but includes hydration, pain medication, and removal of stone. In pediatric patients or repeat stone-forming patients, stone analysis and supersaturation profiles are important for long term management and prevention. There are numerous stone compositions, which can indicate possible underlying pathologies or target therapy. Without appropriate treatment, reoccurring kidney stones can cause permanent renal damage or failure. This presentation provides an overview on kidney stone clinical presentation, laboratory and radiographic findings, composition types, and spontaneous and familial risk factors.

C S P F
Adventures in Arbovirus Diagnostics by Benjamin Pinsky, MD, PhD
Number of Credits: 1.0

Zika virus (ZIKV) is an Aedes mosquito-borne flavivirus that emerged in Brazil in 2015 and then rapidly spread throughout the tropical and subtropical Americas. Based on clinical criteria alone, ZIKV cannot be reliably distinguished from infections with other pathogens that cause an undifferentiated systemic febrile illness, including infections with other common arboviruses such as dengue virus. This presentation details the nucleic acid amplification tests and serological methods that are available to diagnose ZIKV infection.

C S P F
A Quick Guide to the Analytics Behind Genomic Testing by Elaine Gee, PhD
Number of Credits: 1.0

This course features introductory information about the role of bioinformatics in clinical genomic testing by NGS from the perspective of a national reference laboratory. An overview of the various types of bioinformatics pipelines, variant detection methods, and the computational infrastructure supporting these analytical pipelines will be discussed. This course will end with an overview of the validation strategy for bringing a new bioinformatics platform online for clinical production.

C S P F
WHO Updates for Myelodysplastic Syndrome and Myeloproliferative Neoplasms by Jay L. Patel, MD and Archana Agarwal, MD
Number of Credits: 1.0

This presentation will cover WHO updates for both myelodysplastic syndromes and myeloproliferative neoplasms. For myelodysplastic syndromes, emphasis will be placed on the role of somatic gene mutation testing in the diagnosis and prognostication. The challenge of distinction of myelodyspslastic syndromes from preclinical states characterized by clonal hematopoiesis will be discussed. As for updates related to myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs), categories have not changed significantly except the exclusion of mastocytosis. Mastocytosis is now a separate category due to its unique clinical and pathologic features. The update will focus on the molecular as well as the clinical and pathological changes that have been incorporated into the current diagnostic categories of MPNs.

C S P F
Behavior-Based Safety Programs by Christina K. Kulakowski
Number of Credits: 1.0

No short description

C S P F
The Sustainable Laboratory: Perspectives on Laboratory Outreach by Suzanne Carasso, MBA, MT (ASCP) 
Number of Credits: 1.0

Historically, laboratories have operated as revenue centers within hospitals, with providers ordering tests and payers willing to reimburse. Today, labs are trending toward becoming cost centers, with ever-diminishing profit margins. Subsequently, some health system administrators are asking ‘Why keep the laboratory in-house when we can outsource and cut costs?’ Commoditizing laboratory medicine may sound viable at first glance, but on deeper review, is not a sustainable strategy. Competitive differentiation comes from demonstrating unique value the laboratory provides that goes well beyond the price of a test or a test result.

Laboratory outreach is emerging as an opportunity for labs to provide value to hospitals and health systems by providing testing services for all patient types, regardless of location. In addition to lowering unit costs, increasing outreach test volumes provide new revenue streams, positions the laboratory to utilize excess capacity and operate more efficiently.

This session will include an overview of trends impacting labs, differentiate between price and value, and provide detail on laboratory outreach as an integral part of the sustainable laboratory.

C S P F
Placenta Pathology by Jessica Comstock, MD
Number of Credits: 1.0

Placental pathology can be challenging. This lecture will review both common and uncommon diagnoses, especially those with important clinical implications, using the 2014 Amsterdam Placental Workshop Group classifications.

C S P F
Next Generation Sequencing of Hematologic Neoplasms by Todd Kelley, MD
Number of Credits: 0.5

This presentation will provide an overview of next generation sequencing based testing in hematologic malignancies.

C S P F
Harmonization: Why You Should Care! by Greg Miller, PhD, DABCC
Number of Credits: 1.0

The landmark 1999 report from the Institute of Medicine "To Err Is Human: Building a Safer Health System" emphasized the importance of clinical practice guidelines to standardize decisions and treatments. A 2015 follow up report "Improving Diagnosis in Health Care" again emphasized the importance of guidelines and stressed that cooperation among the health care team including laboratory professionals was essential to reduce diagnostic errors. Neither report recognized that diagnostic errors are made when non-harmonized laboratory test results are interpreted using fixed decision values in clinical practice guidelines. Harmonization of laboratory test results is one of the most pressing issues in laboratory medicine. The laboratory profession has developed an infrastructure for achieving harmonized (or standardized) results; yet several technical challenges have prevented a large fraction of our measurement procedures from achieving harmonized results. Recent initiatives are addressing the challenges to achieve harmonization. It is not widely appreciated that regulations can be an impediment to harmonization. Why do IVD manufacturers need to spend millions of dollars for regulatory approval to conform to international recommendations for harmonization that will improve the quality of patient care? Current activities to address these issues will be presented.

C S P F
Sudden Cardiac Death Prevention with Molecular Diagnostic by Rong Mao, MD, FACMG
Number of Credits: 1.0

Sudden cardiac death (SCD), also known as sudden arrest, is a major health problem worldwide. It’s been estimated to affect over 300,000 patients annually in United States; in the range of 50-100 per 100,000 persons. A dynamic triggering factor usually interacts with an underlying heart disease, either genetically determined or acquired, and the final outcome is the development of lethal tachyarrhythmias. A comprehensive DNA test can identify at a young age the patients at risk for SCD. Prevention and early treatment prior to the disease being expressed greatly benefits patients and reduces the risk of sudden cardiac death.

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Paroxysmal Nocturnal Hemoglobinuria: Rare But Real by Nahla Heikal, MD, MS
Number of Credits: 1.0

Paroxysmal Nocturnal Hemoglobinuria (PNH) is a rare disorder with progressive morbidities and mortalities. It is a life threatening disease that causes thrombosis, end organ damage, and impaired quality of life and demands early diagnosis and intervention. The International Clinical Cytometry Society (ICCS) Guidelines and International PNH Interest Group (IPIG) recommend evaluation of high risk patients. Identifying and screening of high risk patients is essential for the diagnosis, management and monitoring of PNH.

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Molecular Testing and Cytopathology: Downsizing Precision Medicine but not Precision by Georgios Deftereos, MD, FCAP, FASCP
Number of Credits: 1.0

Cytology is said to be the art of doing more with less. As minimally invasive tissue procurement techniques evolve and as there is an ever-increasing number of clinically relevant analytes in molecular oncology, this has never been more the case than in this era of precision medicine. There is the need for the cytopathologist, and the anatomic pathologist in general, to be able to understand indications for molecular testing, advantages and limitations of different testing platforms and to develop strategies in order to be able to provide quantitatively and qualitatively adequate specimen, without compromising diagnostic ancillary testing.

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Update on HPV Testing by Robert Schlaberg, MD, Dr Med, MPH
Number of Credits: CME/SAM: 0.75 PACE: 0.5

This talk will provide an overview of the biology and epidemiology of high-risk HPV infections and summarize concepts and performance of available cervical cancer screening tests. An update on recent changes to screening guidelines will be provided.

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Autoantibody Testing in the Diagnosis of Autoimmune Neurological Disorders by Lisa K. Peterson, PhD
Number of Credits: 1.0

Autoimmune neurology is a rapidly evolving field, with additional autoantibodies continually being identified. This presentation will focus on the laboratory’s role in diagnosing and managing autoimmune neurologic disorders, including paraneoplastic neurological syndromes (PNS), autoimmune encephalitis, and autoimmune neuromuscular junction disorders. Also discussed will be methods for detecting autoantibodies in serum and CSF, with an emphasis on their strengths and weaknesses, as well as testing strategies for autoimmune neurologic diseases.

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Employee Mentoring: Fostering a Culture of Contribution by Jo D Fontenot, MS, MT(ASCP)
Number of Credits: 0.5

This lecture will describe the roles of a mentor and protégé. It will evaluate the responsibilities of each member of the partnership to ensure cross functional development within the organizations. It will describe strategies to use when setting up a successful mentoring program.

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Diagnostic Errors in (Anatomic) Pathology by Michael Cohen, MD
Number of Credits: 1.0

The aim of this presentation is to familiarize listeners with the relatively recently (9/2015) released IOM (Institute of Medicine) report on diagnostic errors and the importance of cognitive errors.

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Heparin-Induced Thrombocytopenia: The Dark Side of a Common Anticoagulant by George M. Rodgers III, MD, PhD and Kristi J. Smock, MD
Number of Credits: 1.0

Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is a syndrome of platelet activation, thrombocytopenia, and thrombosis that occurs in 1-5% of patients who receive heparin. HIT is a clinicopathologic diagnosis where laboratory testing plays an essential role. Accurate and timely diagnosis is essential to avoid potentially life- or limb- threatening thrombotic complications. It is also important to avoid HIT over-diagnosis, which is common, and leads to suboptimal patient management. This presentation will emphasize the role of the laboratory in HIT diagnosis. At the conclusion, participants will be able to describe the syndrome, available laboratory testing, and optimal diagnostic algorithms.

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Is There a Bully in the Room? by Tiffany A. Bradshaw, MLS(ASCP)CM
Number of Credits: 0.5

This lecture will examine how bullying in the workplace might be defined and specific examples of how these behaviors might be displayed. In addition, methods for addressing and dealing with bullying, as well as current legislative and organizational strategies, will be covered.

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ELISA Science by The ARUP Institute for Learning
Number of Credits: PACE: 1.0 Florida: 1.3

This course describes the Enzyme Linked Immunosorbant Assay (ELISA) testing method used in many analytical tests. Included are descriptions of the testing process and what is being tested. Animations are used to help illustrate what is happening at the molecular level.

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Personalized Drug Therapy Is Here! An Update on Genetic Tools and Clinical Decision Support Available to Guide Drug and Dose Selection Today by Gwen McMillin, PhD, DABCC(CC,TC)
Number of Credits: 1.0

A person's response to a drug is dependent on many factors, including genetic variation. Targeted genetic testing can predict adverse drug reactions and therapeutic failure, as well as the need for non-standard dosing of several clinically important drugs. Expert consensus regarding implementing specific drug-gene associations has led to clinical decision support that can guide drug and dose selection based on genetic test results. This webinar will offer examples of how genetic testing can be used to personalize pharmacotherapy decisions.

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Introduction to Antibody Identification by Justin R. Rhees, MS, MLS(ASCP)CM, SBBCM
Number of Credits: 1.0

Several effective approaches to antibody identification in the routine blood bank exist. This presentation explains a conservative approach to antibody identification and several demonstrations of ruling out, choosing appropriate selected cells, and completing antibody workups are given.

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Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Laboratory Tests by Robert Schmidt, MD, PhD, MBA
Number of Credits: 1.0

Laboratories are under intense pressure to increase value. Cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) can help labs increase value by identifying optimum testing scenarios. This webinar explains important concepts such as cost-perspectives, methods for estimating costs, estimating outcomes, evaluating outcomes, and evaluating uncertainty in model outputs. At the end of this lecture, viewers will understand the different types of frameworks and analyses that are used in cost-effectiveness analysis.

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The Lewis System by Justin R. Rhees, MS, MLS(ASCP)CM, SBBCM
Number of Credits: 0.5

The Lewis system is unique among blood group systems in that the antigens are not manufactured within the erythrocyte, nor do they form an integral part of the cytoskeletal membrane. Rather, they are synthesized by tissues, secreted into blood and body fluids, and adsorb onto the red blood cell. While antibodies against antigens in this system are fairly commonly encountered, they are generally not considered to be clinically significant in transfusion. In vitro and in vivo hemolysis are rare but have been reported. Because Lewis phenotype expression is based upon the interaction of several genes, and because the phenotype expression can be transient, the Lewis system is a fascinating system to learn about.

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Diagnostic Approach to Anemia by Archana Mishra Agarwal, MD
Number of Credits: PACE: 1.0 Florida: 1.3

The understanding of anemias is very important as clinicians attempt to provide high quality medical care to their patients. The medical laboratory scientist must also understand anemias to provide the needed information to physicians. This lecture will address the basics of the classification of anemias and tools used in the medical laboratory to assess a patient’s blood health or presence of anemia.

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Hematology M+Ms: Morphology and Mystery (Case Studies) by Karen A. Brown, MS, MLS(ASCP)CM
Number of Credits: 1.0

Hematology instrumentation has advanced to now routinely include at least a five-part differential and, in some laboratories, automated cell image analysis. Yet, a manual examination of the blood smear is still an essential procedure that provides valuable diagnostic information. This session will use case studies to define important morphologic variations and physiologic processes in selected disease conditions.

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The Illusion of Quality: A Discussion of Roadblocks to Laboratory Quality and Case Studies of How to Make Things Better by Frederick G. Strathmann, PhD, DABCC (CC, TC)
Number of Credits: 1.0

The purpose of this presentation is to emphasize the need for every laboratory to continuously review its quality processes. The recent changes surrounding Equivocal QC practices provide an opportunity for laboratories to ensure minimum requirements are met and a chance to move towards raising the bar internally for quality requirements. Practical and real-world examples of how to prepare, implement, and measure the impact of changing quality will be presented and discussed.

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Laboratory Formularies: Improving Care, Reducing Costs by Brian R. Jackson, MD, MS
Number of Credits: 0.5

Laboratory formularies are an emerging tool for promoting effective use of the clinical laboratory. This presentation covers the key considerations for developing, applying, and managing a lab formulary: governance, process, evidence base, and analytics. In the end, a formulary is not so much a product as it is an interconnected system for managing and influencing diagnostic practices.

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The Value of the Laboratory: Invest or Outsource? by Suzanne Carasso, MBA, MT (ASCP)
Number of Credits: 1.0

The impact of national healthcare reform, is putting pressure on the healthcare industry to navigate reductions in reimbursement, implement cost-cutting initiatives and improve patient outcomes and quality of life. Changing the way healthcare is delivered and paid for is the new imperative.

Laboratories, now more than ever before, have a unique opportunity to substantially impact both short and long term sustainability of healthcare organizations. However, labs that continue to just produce lab test results will be viewed as a commodity and will likely be outsourced or sold. Some organizations are selling laboratory and outreach operations to private equity firms, joint venture capitalists or national laboratories in exchange for an immediate and significant infusion of cash. It follows that laboratories failing to demonstrate value to the organization face an uncertain future.

This presentation will inform attendees of the industry trends that are influencing these decisions, the risks laboratories face and what labs can do to demonstrate value in tangible ways.

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Testing a Test: Beyond Sensitivity and Specificity by Robert Schmidt, MD, PhD, MBA
Number of Credits: 1.0

In this lecture, Dr. Schmidt covers performance evaluation of diagnostic tests. Traditional performance measures such as sensitivity, specificity and ROC curves are reviewed. Reasons for differences in diagnostic studies are examined including real differences, threshold effects, sources of bias, and random variation. Shortcomings of the traditional approaches to test evaluation are also discussed and alternative approaches such as diagnostic research (vs test research), clinical trial evaluation, and cost-effectiveness evaluation are presented.

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Diagnostic Error & Laboratory Testing by Mark L. Graber, MD, FACP
Number of Credits: 1.0

Diagnostic error is a major patient safety concern, causing substantial harm and unnecessary medial costs. In every large organization, cases related to diagnostic error make up the largest fraction of filed claims and suits. Although the error rate is not being measured in any setting, it is estimated that 1 in 10 diagnoses is wrong, significantly delayed, or missed altogether. The root causes of diagnostic error include many system-based factors (eg breakdowns in communication, coordinating care, having expertise available when needed, supervision of trainees, etc) as well as cognitive shortcomings. The cognitive errors mostly derive from failures to synthesize the available evidence and inappropriate trust of intuition. Errors related to diagnostic testing are common, and include mistakes by the patient’s doctor (not knowing the best test to order or how to interpret it) as well as problems performing and interpreting the test results by the clinical lab or the Radiology department staff. Many interventions to reduce diagnostic error have been proposed, although few have been rigorously evaluated in clinical practice.

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The Delta Check in Action: Causes and Consequences of Discrepant Laboratory Results by Joely A. Straseski, PhD, MS, MT(ASCP), DABCC
Number of Credits: 1.0

Discrepant results are often identified by delta check alerts. Delta checks compare current laboratory results to previous results; if the difference between the two values exceeds predetermined biological limits (within a predetermined length of time), a technologist is alerted and the discrepancy can be investigated further. Causes of discrepant laboratory results include both preanalytical and analytical issues, as well as true biological changes occurring within the patient.

Many preanalytical issues cannot be detected by traditional QC methods, leading to the possible reporting of erroneous laboratory results. The wrong result compromises patient care by leading to inappropriate diagnoses or treatment. Delta check alerts provide an additional means to identify these types of problems, in addition to alerting health care providers to true changes in their patient’s condition.

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Laboratory Results - Beyond Patient Testing by Cheryl Vincent, MBA
Number of Credits: 1.0

Clinical Laboratory Scientists are trained to perform laboratory tests and to troubleshoot and validate the results of those tests which contribute to a patient’s medical diagnosis. During this presentation, we will compare the steps involved in pre-analytical, analytical, and post-analytical laboratory testing to the steps involved in pre-analytical, analytical, and post-analytical phases of developing leaders in the clinical laboratory.

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Blood Bank vs Piggy Bank: Keys to Harmonizing Margin and Mission by Kent Gordon, CPA, MAcc
Number of Credits: 1.0

Tired of fighting with the finance department to get the resources you need to carry out your mission? Ever feel that your CFO is from a different planet and that you just can’t communicate? Do financial concerns kill creativity and stifle progress in your organization? Where is the peace? Where is the love?

This lecture will give you practical tips and tools to help your organization balance operational and financial considerations. First, this course unlocks the mysterious world of accounting . . . revealing the core principles, objectives, and concepts of this centuries-old art. Next, we tackle the sometimes thorny subject of “Margin” verses “Mission” providing some useful prospective on this important topic. Next, we shatter the language barrier, giving you simple terms and lingo to facilitate financial communications. Soon you’ll be fluent in the latest accounting jargon. Finally, we conclude with some take-home financial analysis tools that will have your finance people saying: “Wow! – How’d you get so darn smart?!!!”

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Are You a Customer Service “Have” or “Have Not”? by Cherie V. Petersen, BA
Number of Credits: 1.0

This shouldn’t be shocking news to most healthcare professionals, but customer service IS a critical function of quality patient care. However, when we as laboratorians think about customer service activities and how that translates into patient care, we tend to think it’s just about what occurs in the literal presence of patients. So, here’s what may be news to some, the patient experience isn’t just about what we do when we’re in their physical presence, but also what we do as we interact with everyone who is in any way associated with their care. Therefore, we must make every effort to be engaged in skilled customer service activities with everyone, at all times. Now, the question may arise, what ARE the necessary skills and activities for providing great customer service (i.e., quality patient care) and how well do YOU execute them? This session will provide an opportunity for self-assessment utilizing a customer service skills preferred profile and an interactive discussion regarding the do’s and don’ts for outstanding customer service.

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Designing for Improvement by Bonnie Messinger, CPHQ, CMQ/OE (ASQ), Six Sigma Black Belt
Number of Credits: 0.5

Our traditional response to complex problems is to find and eliminate the human behaviors that we think are responsible for errors, and are perplexed when the error we thought we eradicated occurs again and again. We ignore the fact that 95% of process performance is attributable to the design of the work and the system in which the work resides and only 5% to the human component. The importance of creative design in the laboratory is often overlooked and its potential is underutilized. In this session we will discover how to design a work environment where error is, if not impossible, at least very difficult. Using innovative problem solving principles and techniques, we will open the door to organizational excellence by design.

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Review of Malaria and Plasmodium Species by DeVon C. Hale, MD
Number of Credits: 1.0

This is a basic overview of the disease malaria and the causative agents, Plasmodium species. The life cycles of the parasites and their differentiating characteristics in the human host are discussed, for Plasmodium falciparum. P. ovale, P. vivax, P. malariae. Case studies demonstrate the disease states caused by each species.

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Phlebotomy Ps and Qs: Problems and Quandaries in Specimen Collection by Karen A. Brown, MS, MLS(ASCP)CM
Number of Credits: 1.0

Phlebotomists routinely encounter dangerous conditions, problem patients, and other issues during blood collection. This session will suggest techniques that can help you avoid or safely manage these difficulties. Areas to be discussed include:

  • risks associated with venous blood collection, such as improper vein selection and needlestick exposure
  • unusual patient situations that impact phlebotomy practice, including the cancer and bariatric patient
  • communication barriers and methods to improve patient interactions, like developing good listening skills and effective communication approaches with the elderly

Designed for phlebotomists and phlebotomy students who have comprehension of the basics of the venipuncture technique, this session will enhance your skills, build your knowledge base, and help you deliver the highest quality in patient care.

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Reporting Laboratory Errors Without Fear by Lucinda Manning, BA, MT(ASCP), RN
Number of Credits: 1.0

Employees being able to report laboratory errors without fear is a key component of an effective error management system. This presentation will focus on the necessity for making the system useful and easy to use. Case studies are used to discuss a variety of errors and to illustrate how identification of errors can lead to practical solutions in error prevention. A just culture vs. punitive culture will be addressed along with ideas for getting employee “buy-in”. Additionally, strategies for mentoring and coaching employees with high error rates will be provided.

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Diagnosing Specimen Collection Issues by Ken Curtis, BS PBT(ASCP)
Number of Credits: 1.0

Errors in specimen collection result in inaccurate results. This presentation focuses on identifying specimen collection issues and strategies for preventing them. We will discuss common errors in patient identification, phlebotomy techniques, and specimen labeling. We will also discuss identifying collection issues via pre-analytical processes, training for accuracy in collection, and monitoring improvement.

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The Human Side of Change Management by Cheryl Vincent, MBA
Number of Credits: 1.0

When we bring up the topic of change, we often think of it as a negative. But why? We’re not opposed to changing a hairstyle, the color of our hair, changing cars, or even changing jobs. Now cell phone contracts are starting to lighten up so we can have a new cell phone almost every six months. There has been a lot of information written about the logical steps to change, but what about the human side of change? Cheryl Vincent will discuss the steps to change but also add a human dimension to the concept of Change Management.

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When Professionals Meet: Bridging the Gap Between the Laboratory and Nursing by Lucinda Manning, BA, MT(ASCP), RN
Number of Credits: 1.0

Ms. Manning will give a comparison of the differences in learning in the laboratory and nursing professions. She will share personal examples of the struggles each profession has in understanding each other. She will also discuss practical ways to bridge the gaps in understanding between the two professions. Ms. Manning encourages the audience to be interactive and to share problems as well as best practices and successes in bridging the gap between these two professions.

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Error Proofing the Laboratory by Bonnie Messinger, CPHQ, CMQ/OE (ASQ), Six Sigma Black Belt
Number of Credits: 1.0

Eradicating error in healthcare may seem like a Sisyphean task, yet legislators, regulators and the public in general expect error-free work from medical professionals. How to work without error is the subject of countless lectures, papers and studies, encompassing every discipline from manufacturing to service. The Toyota Production System of quality manufacturing uses the term "poke-yoke" (mistake-proofing) to describe the process of eliminating production defects. "Error-Proofing in Healthcare" will distill and discuss the essential elements of "poke-yoke", starting with defining and exploring the types of error most often encountered in the provision of medical care. Proven improvement tools and techniques for ensuring quality outputs will be presented with practical applications to place the error-proofing strategy in the context of the laboratory.

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***The archived video lectures listed below no longer provide
continuing education credit
since their CE certification has expired.***