Video Lecture Inherited Thrombophilia Testing: Pros and Cons

Thrombophilia testing can identify causes of inherited venous thromboembolism in 50-60 percent of patients with thrombosis due to a genetic cause. However, the clinical utility of such testing is controversial, and testing patients at the time of acute thrombosis or while they are on anticoagulant therapy may lead to incorrect results. This webinar will provide an overview of available tests, recommended tests, and summarize some of the limitations of inherited thrombophilia testing. The available data suggest that identifying an inherited cause for thrombosis does not usually alter patient management.

Originally presented January 25, 2012 in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Lecture Presenter

George M. Rodgers III, MD, PhD George M. Rodgers III, MD, PhD
Medical Director, Hemostasis/Thrombosis Laboratory, ARUP Laboratories
Professor of Medicine, University of Utah School of Medicine
Professor of Pathology, University of Utah School of Medicine

Dr. Rogers is the medical director of the Hemostasis and Thrombosis Laboratory at ARUP and a professor of medicine and pathology at the University of Utah School of Medicine. Dr. Rogers received his PhD in pharmacology and his MD from the Tulane University School of Medicine. He is certified in internal medicine by the American Board of Internal Medicine and in hematology by the American Board of Pathology. Dr. Rogers is the co-editor of Wintrobe's Clinical Hematology.

Lecture Presenter

Kristi J. Smock, MD Kristi J. Smock, MD
Medical Director, Hemostasis/Thrombosis Laboratory, ARUP Laboratories
Assistant Professor of Pathology, University of Utah School of Medicine

Dr. Smock is the medical director of the Hemostasis/Thrombosis Laboratory at ARUP and an assistant professor of pathology at the University of Utah School of Medicine. She received her MD from the University of Utah and completed residency training in anatomic and clinical pathology and fellowship training in hematopathology at the University of Utah. She is board certified by the American Board of Pathology in anatomic and clinical pathology with subspecialty certification in hematology. She is a fellow of the College of American Pathologists and American Society for Clinical Pathology and is a member of several other professional organizations, including the International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis. Dr. Smock has research interests in a variety of areas related to hemostasis/thrombosis.

Objectives

  • This series reviews clinical indications for laboratory tests which are commonly ordered inappropriately.

Sponsored by:

ARUP Laboratories