Annual Park City Update

Program Schedule

Sunday, February 10
4:30-5:30 pm
Scott Florell, MD

Scott Florell, MD

Associate Professor of Dermatology, University of Utah School of Medicine
title, institution

Dr. Scott Florell is an associate professor of dermatology. With an interest in the education, career development, and mentoring of residents, Dr. Florell has been the Residency Program Director for the Department of Dermatology since 2010. He is a reviewer for several dermatopathology and dermatology journals and has authored or co-authored more than 80 journal articles with an emphasis on familial melanoma, nevus phenotype among familial melanoma kindreds, and cutaneous oncology. Dr. Florell is particularly interested in the research of melanoma and pigmented lesions.

Selected Cases in Inflammatory Dermatopathology
5:30-6:30 pm
Henry D. Tazelaar, MD

Henry D. Tazelaar, MD

Professor of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology
Consultant, Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, Mayo Clinic in Arizona

Dr. Henry Tazelaar is Chair of the Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology at Mayo Clinic in Arizona, and he is a Consultant in the Division of Anatomic Pathology in Arizona. Dr. Tazelaar also serves as Chair of the Laboratory Medicine and Pathology Specialty Council. He joined the staff of Mayo Clinic in 1988 and holds the academic rank of Professor of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology.

Dr. Tazelaar earned his Bachelor of Arts degree at Calvin College in Grand Rapids, Michigan, and his M.D. at Rush Medical College in Chicago. He completed both an internship and residency in pathology at Stanford University Medical Center, followed by a National Institutes of Health postdoctoral fellowship in the pathology of heart-lung transplantation in the laboratory of Dr. Margaret Billingham at Stanford University Medical Center, where he subsequently completed a fellowship in surgical pathology.

Dr. Tazelaar’s work has focused on refining criteria used to diagnose the rejection of transplanted hearts and lungs. He is also active in identifying new pulmonary diseases and better understanding how systemic diseases affect the lungs and pleura. His observations have led to the identification of several new or unusual pulmonary diseases.

Clinically, Dr. Tazelaar is a surgical pathologist, a role that includes a large thoracic consultation practice offering second opinions on biopsy and cytology specimens. He is also an active educator, providing mentorship to a multitude of residents and fellows. In addition, he has taught in the Cytotechnology Program of the Mayo Clinic School of Health Sciences and Mayo Clinic School of Medicine.

Dr. Tazelaar is a fellow of the American College of Chest Physicians and College of American Pathologists, where he is a member of the Pulmonary and Mediastinum Tumors Cancer Protocol Review Panel. He is active in many other professional organizations, serving on numerous committees and in leadership roles, including a tenure as president of the Pulmonary Pathology Society. He was also a member of the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation groups that standardize reporting of heart and lung rejection. Dr. Tazelaar is currently Treasurer of the International Academy of Pathology and Chair of the Finance Committee of the United States and Canadian Academy of Pathology.

Help! What do I do with Those Granulomas in the Lung?
6:30-7:30 pm
Henry D. Tazelaar, MD

Henry D. Tazelaar, MD

Professor of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology
Consultant, Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, Mayo Clinic in Arizona

Dr. Henry Tazelaar is Chair of the Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology at Mayo Clinic in Arizona, and he is a Consultant in the Division of Anatomic Pathology in Arizona. Dr. Tazelaar also serves as Chair of the Laboratory Medicine and Pathology Specialty Council. He joined the staff of Mayo Clinic in 1988 and holds the academic rank of Professor of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology.

Dr. Tazelaar earned his Bachelor of Arts degree at Calvin College in Grand Rapids, Michigan, and his M.D. at Rush Medical College in Chicago. He completed both an internship and residency in pathology at Stanford University Medical Center, followed by a National Institutes of Health postdoctoral fellowship in the pathology of heart-lung transplantation in the laboratory of Dr. Margaret Billingham at Stanford University Medical Center, where he subsequently completed a fellowship in surgical pathology.

Dr. Tazelaar’s work has focused on refining criteria used to diagnose the rejection of transplanted hearts and lungs. He is also active in identifying new pulmonary diseases and better understanding how systemic diseases affect the lungs and pleura. His observations have led to the identification of several new or unusual pulmonary diseases.

Clinically, Dr. Tazelaar is a surgical pathologist, a role that includes a large thoracic consultation practice offering second opinions on biopsy and cytology specimens. He is also an active educator, providing mentorship to a multitude of residents and fellows. In addition, he has taught in the Cytotechnology Program of the Mayo Clinic School of Health Sciences and Mayo Clinic School of Medicine.

Dr. Tazelaar is a fellow of the American College of Chest Physicians and College of American Pathologists, where he is a member of the Pulmonary and Mediastinum Tumors Cancer Protocol Review Panel. He is active in many other professional organizations, serving on numerous committees and in leadership roles, including a tenure as president of the Pulmonary Pathology Society. He was also a member of the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation groups that standardize reporting of heart and lung rejection. Dr. Tazelaar is currently Treasurer of the International Academy of Pathology and Chair of the Finance Committee of the United States and Canadian Academy of Pathology.

Spindle Cell Conundrums in the Chest
Monday, February 11
7:00-8:00 am
Henry D. Tazelaar, MD

Henry D. Tazelaar, MD

Professor of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology
Consultant, Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, Mayo Clinic in Arizona

Dr. Henry Tazelaar is Chair of the Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology at Mayo Clinic in Arizona, and he is a Consultant in the Division of Anatomic Pathology in Arizona. Dr. Tazelaar also serves as Chair of the Laboratory Medicine and Pathology Specialty Council. He joined the staff of Mayo Clinic in 1988 and holds the academic rank of Professor of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology.

Dr. Tazelaar earned his Bachelor of Arts degree at Calvin College in Grand Rapids, Michigan, and his M.D. at Rush Medical College in Chicago. He completed both an internship and residency in pathology at Stanford University Medical Center, followed by a National Institutes of Health postdoctoral fellowship in the pathology of heart-lung transplantation in the laboratory of Dr. Margaret Billingham at Stanford University Medical Center, where he subsequently completed a fellowship in surgical pathology.

Dr. Tazelaar’s work has focused on refining criteria used to diagnose the rejection of transplanted hearts and lungs. He is also active in identifying new pulmonary diseases and better understanding how systemic diseases affect the lungs and pleura. His observations have led to the identification of several new or unusual pulmonary diseases.

Clinically, Dr. Tazelaar is a surgical pathologist, a role that includes a large thoracic consultation practice offering second opinions on biopsy and cytology specimens. He is also an active educator, providing mentorship to a multitude of residents and fellows. In addition, he has taught in the Cytotechnology Program of the Mayo Clinic School of Health Sciences and Mayo Clinic School of Medicine.

Dr. Tazelaar is a fellow of the American College of Chest Physicians and College of American Pathologists, where he is a member of the Pulmonary and Mediastinum Tumors Cancer Protocol Review Panel. He is active in many other professional organizations, serving on numerous committees and in leadership roles, including a tenure as president of the Pulmonary Pathology Society. He was also a member of the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation groups that standardize reporting of heart and lung rejection. Dr. Tazelaar is currently Treasurer of the International Academy of Pathology and Chair of the Finance Committee of the United States and Canadian Academy of Pathology.

What’s New in Inflammatory and Fibrotic Lung Disease?
8:00-9:00 am
David Wada, MD

David Wada, MD

Assistant Professor of Dermatology, University of Utah School of Medicine

David Wada, MD is an assistant professor of dermatology at the University of Utah Health Sciences Center and Huntsman Cancer Institute. He is a member of the Cutaneous Lymphoma program at the Huntsman Cancer Institute.

Dr. Wada’s clinical and research interests are focused on cutaneous lymphoma and related disorders. Having trained in dermatology, dermatopathology, and anatomic/clinical pathology, he has had the opportunity to clinically evaluate and study numerous lymphoma patients over the past 10 years and has published his findings in major peer-reviewed journals with multiple presentations at national meetings. He is also experienced in the evaluation of lymphomatoid diseases, skin conditions associated with systemic lymphoproliferative and myeloid disorders, and melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancers.

Dr. Wada is specifically interested in clinical and translational investigation related to the discovery of specific markers in cutaneous lymphoma with diagnostic and therapeutic potential. In a recent study, he was able to validate the specificity of a novel marker in primary cutaneous anaplastic T-cell lymphoma. He is collaborating with faculty from various departments to continue to pursue research in cutaneous T- and B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma with the goal of obtaining and applying scientific data that will serve to improve the accuracy of diagnosis/classification and enhance therapeutic outcomes of patients with this unique and challenging group of diseases.

Cutaneous T-cell Lymphoproliferations: A Clinical and Pathologic Spectrum of Benign and Malignant Disorders
4:30-5:30 pm
Josh Coleman, MD

Josh Coleman, MD

Assistant Professor of Pathology, University of Utah School of Medicine
Medical Director, Molecular Oncology, ARUP Laboratories

Dr. Coleman recently joined the University of Utah School of Medicine as an assistant professor of pathology. He earned his MD at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine in Cleveland, OH, in 2007. Dr. Coleman subsequently completed his residency in anatomic and clinical pathology at the Cleveland Clinic (2011), followed by fellowships in hematopathology at the University of New Mexico (2012) and molecular genetic pathology at ARUP Laboratories/University of Utah (2013). He is board certified in molecular genetic pathology, hematopathology, and anatomic and clinical pathology, practicing most recently at the Ohio State University (2013–16). Immediately prior to joining the University of Utah, Dr. Coleman served as the vice president of medical affairs with GenomOnocology, LLC, in Cleveland, Ohio. His academic interests include leveraging machine learning techniques to facilitate interpretation of genomic data.

Tumor Mutation Burden and the Genomic Landscape of Lung Carcinoma
5:30-6:30 pm
Tracy George, MD

Tracy George, MD

Professor of Pathology, University of Utah School of Medicine
Executive Director, Clinical Trials and PharmaDx, ARUP Laboratories
Medical Director, Hematopathology, ARUP Laboratories

Dr. George is a professor of pathology at the University of Utah School of Medicine. She completed her MD and residency training in anatomic pathology and laboratory medicine at the University of California San Francisco, with fellowships in hematopathology and surgical pathology at Stanford University. Dr. George is board certified in anatomic pathology, clinical pathology, and hematology by the American Board of Pathology. Her research interests include mast cell disease and laboratory hematology. Dr. George has authored more than 100 publications, is Vice President of Scientific Communications for the International Society for Laboratory Hematology, and Co-Editor-in-Chief of the International Journal of Laboratory Hematology. She received the College of American Pathologists Lifetime Achievement Award in 2014.

Morphologic Mimics of Lymphomas: What Every Practicing Pathologist Needs to Know
6:30-7:30 pm
Wallace Akerley, MD

Wallace Akerley, MD

Professor, Department of Medicine, Division of Medical Oncology, University of Utah School of Medicine
Co-director of the Thoracic Cancer Program, Huntsman Cancer Institute

In addition to his leadership responsibilities, Akerley treats patients with many types of cancer, focusing on lung cancer and melanoma. He participates on the lung cancer committees of two national organizations for cancer treatment: Southwest Oncology Group (SWOG) and National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN). Akerley joined Huntsman Cancer Institute in 2002. Previously, he was director of medical oncology and associate director of the Boston University Cancer Center. He received his medical degree at Brown University in Rhode Island, completed his residency at the University of Southern California (USC), and served additional fellowships at USC/Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center and the Norris Cotton Cancer Center at Dartmouth College in New Hampshire.

Lung Cancer: Lumper-Splitter is no Longer the Debate
Tuesday, February 12
7:00-8:00 am
Christian Davidson, MD

Christian Davidson, MD

Assistant Professor of Pathology, University of Utah School of Medicine
Medical Director, Anatomic Pathology, ARUP Laboratories

Dr. Davidson is an assistant professor of pathology at the University of Utah School of Medicine. After receiving his MD from Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia, he completed his anatomic pathology residency training at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and his neuropathology fellowship at Massachusetts General Hospital, both in Boston. Dr. Davidson is a member of the American Association of Neuropathologists. In addition, he has a longstanding interest in molecular tumorigenesis of brain tumors, specifically the diffuse gliomas and NF2-related tumors.

Neurosurgical Frozen Section...It’s Not That Hard After All
8:00-9:00 am
Keith Duffy, MD

Keith Duffy, MD

Associate Professor of Dermatology, University of Utah School of Medicine
Investigator, Huntsman Cancer Institute

Keith Duffy, MD, is an associate professor in the Department of Dermatology at the University of Utah School of Medicine and a Huntsman Cancer Institute investigator. Dr. Duffy's clinical interests include Mohs surgery (a microscopic technique that allows skin cancers to be removed with very narrow surgical margins), facial reconstruction post-Mohs surgery, and diagnostic dermatopathology (the study of skin diseases at the microscopic level). He is board certified in Dermatology and Dermatopathology. He is also a Fellow of the American Academy of Dermatology, the American College of Mohs Surgery and Cutaneous Oncology, and the American Society of Dermatopathology. His research interests include non-melanoma skin cancers (basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma), melanoma, treatment of rare skin cancers, and wound healing.

The State of the Dysplastic Nevus in the 21st Century
4:30-5:30 pm
Georgios Deftereos, MD

Georgios Deftereos, MD

Assistant Professor of Pathology, University of Utah School of Medicine
Section Head and Medical Director, Molecular Oncology, ARUP Laboratories

Dr. Deftereos is an assistant professor of pathology at the University of Utah School of Medicine. He received his MD from the University of Bari Aldo Moro in Italy. Prior to his pathology training, Dr. Deftereos completed a research fellowship focusing on HPV and gynecological malignancies at the University of Washington in Seattle, Washington. He then completed a residency in anatomic and clinical pathology at Allegheny General Hospital in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, followed by consecutive clinical fellowships in cytopathology and molecular genetic pathology at the University of Washington. Dr. Deftereos is board certified in anatomic pathology, clinical pathology, cytopathology, and molecular genetic pathology, and provides service in the areas of molecular oncology and cytopathology. His research interests include epigenetics of solid tumors and minimally invasive precision diagnostics, with emphasis on the use of molecular testing in cytopathology of solid tumors.

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Larissa Furtado, MD

Larissa Furtado, MD

Assistant Professor of Pathology, University of Utah School of Medicine
Medical Director, Molecular Oncology, ARUP Laboratories

Dr. Furtado is an assistant professor of pathology at the University of Utah School of Medicine. She completed her residency in anatomic and clinical pathology at the University of Utah and ARUP Laboratories, where she was chief resident, and her molecular genetic pathology fellowship at the University of Michigan. Prior to joining ARUP as a medical director, Dr. Furtado co-founded the Division of Genomic and Molecular Pathology at the University of Chicago, where she worked as an assistant professor of pathology and was the co-director of the University of Chicago Clinical Genomics and Molecular Diagnostics Laboratories. Dr. Furtado’s research interests include genomic diagnostics in solid tumors and molecular diagnostic methods in oncology.

Updates on PD-L1 Biomarker Testing
5:30-6:30 pm
Archana Agarwal, MD

Archana Agarwal, MD

Associate Professor of Pathology, University of Utah School of Medicine
Medical Director, Hematopathology and Special Genetics, ARUP Laboratories

Dr. Agarwal is an associate professor of pathology at the University of Utah School of Medicine. She received her MD at Delhi University in India and was a postdoctoral research scholar at the University of Iowa. She served as a pathology resident, a hematopathology fellow, and a molecular genetics pathology fellow at the University of Utah School of Medicine. Dr. Agarwal is board certified in hematopathology, anatomic pathology, and clinical pathology. She is also a member of several professional societies, including the College of American Pathologists and the American Society for Clinical Pathology. Dr. Agarwal’s research interests include red-cell enzymopathies, hemoglobinopathies, and molecular hematopathology.

Work Up of Acute Leukemia
6:30-7:30 pm
Kristin Karner, MD

Kristin Karner, MD

Assistant Professor of Pathology, University of Utah School of Medicine
Medical Director, Hematopathology, ARUP Laboratories

Dr. Karner is an assistant professor of pathology at the University of Utah School of Medicine. She received her MD from the University of Nebraska and completed her anatomic and clinical pathology residency at the University of New Mexico. She also completed hematopathology and molecular genetic pathology fellowships at the University of New Mexico and is board certified by the American Board of Pathology in anatomic and clinical pathology (AP/CP), as well as hematopathology and molecular genetic pathology. Dr. Karner’s areas of focus include both lymphoid and myeloid malignancies, and her current research interests include genetic aspects of myelodysplastic syndrome and other myeloid malignancies.

Molecular Tools in the Diagnosis of Lymphoma
Wednesday, February 13
7:00-8:00 am
Evin Gulbahce, MD

Evin Gulbahce, MD

Professor of Pathology, University of Utah School of Medicine
Medical Director, Surgical Pathology and Oncology, ARUP Laboratories

Dr. Gulbahce is a professor of pathology at the University of Utah School of Medicine. She received her MD from Hacettepe University in Ankara, Turkey, and completed a residency in anatomic and clinical pathology and a surgical pathology fellowship at the University of Minnesota. Her research interests include pulmonary complications of solid organs, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and breast cancer risk factors, specifically risk factor for basal-like and triple negative cancers.

What is Changing (again) in HER2 Testing of Breast Cancers
8:00-9:00 am
Joanna Savage, MD

Joanna Savage, MD

Assistant Professor of Pathology, University of Utah School of Medicine
Medical Director, Anatomic Pathology, ARUP Laboratories

Dr. Savage is an assistant professor of pathology at the University of Utah School of Medicine. She received her MD from the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine and completed a residency in anatomic and clinical pathology, as well as a surgical pathology fellowship, at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics. She subsequently went on to complete a two-year fellowship/junior faculty position in gynecologic pathology at The Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland. Dr. Savage is board certified by the American Board of Pathology and is a fellow of the College of American Pathologists and the American Society of Clinical Pathology. She is a member of the International Society of Gynecological Pathologists, the International Society of Urological Pathology, the United States and Canadian Academy of Pathology, the College of American Pathologists, and the American Society of Clinical Pathology. Her primary research interests include oncologic gynecologic pathology.

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Jola Jedrzkiewicz, MD

Jola Jedrzkiewicz, MD

Assistant Professor of Pathology, Division of Medical Oncology, University of Utah School of Medicine
Medical Director, Gastrointestinal Pathology and FISH, ARUP Laboratories

Dr. Jedrzkiewicz is an assistant professor of pathology at the University of Utah School of Medicine. She obtained her MD from Poznan University of Medical Sciences in Poland. She completed her anatomic and clinical pathology residency at the University of Utah, followed by an oncologic surgical pathology fellowship at the MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston and a gastrointestinal fellowship at the Mount Saini Hospital in Toronto. She is certified by the American Board of Pathology in anatomic and clinical pathology and is a member of United States and Canadian Academy of Pathology, as well as the College of American Pathologists. Dr. Jedrzkiewicz has research interests in oncologic gastrointestinal pathology and appendiceal neoplasms.

Gynecologic and Gastrointestinal Pathology: Pitfalls and Pearls in Frozen Section Diagnosis
4:30-5:30 pm
Deepika Sirohi, MD

Deepika Sirohi, MD

Assistant Professor of Pathology, University of Utah School of Medicine
Medical Director, Molecular Oncology, ARUP Laboratories

Dr. Deepika Sirohi is an assistant professor of pathology at the University of Utah School of Medicine. She received her MD from Armed Forces Medical College in Prune, Maharashtra, India and went on to complete her residency in anatomical and clinical pathology at University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio where she served as Co-chief Resident. Dr. Sirohi completed fellowship programs in Genitourinary Pathology at Cedar-Sinai Medical Center and Molecular Genetic Pathology at the University of California San Francisco. She is board certified by the American Board of Pathology in Anatomical and Clinical Pathology. Her research interests include genomic alterations in urologic malignancies, viral oncogenesis and application of next generation sequencing to solid tumors.

Molecular Subtypes of Renal Cell Carcinomas
5:30-6:30 pm
Mahul Amin, MD

Mahul Amin, MD

Professor and Chairman of Pathology, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Gerwin Endowed Chair for Cancer Research

Dr. Mahul Amin is an internationally recognized researcher, leading urologic pathologist and highly effective operations executive, with consistent success heading up clinical practice and research transformations in translational pathology, leading growth, and increasing industry recognition for large academic laboratories. He is an international consultant in tumors of the genitourinary tract and a world-renowned expert and educator in genitourinary pathology having co-authored the 2002 WHO classification systems for urothelial tumors and renal neoplasms; and the 2016 WHO classification systems for tumors of the prostate, bladder, kidney, penis and testis.

He has made pioneering contributions including the first major descriptions of entities in genitourinary pathology including lymphoepithelioma-like carcinoma of the bladder, micropapillary carcinoma of the bladder, acquired cystic disease associated renal cell carcinoma, clear cell-papillary renal cell carcinoma, thyroid-like carcinoma of the kidney, tubulocystic carcinoma of the kidney, intratubular large cell hyalinizing sertoli cell neoplasia of the testis, and low-grade glandular tumors of the urachus. He has authored some of the first major series and descriptions on Succinate dehydrogenase - deficient renal cell carcinoma and Fumarate hydratase- deficient renal cell carcinoma and the classification of neuroendocrine tumors of the prostate.

His scientific interests are in the discovery and validation of biomarkers in urologic malignancies for clinical personalized medicine. He has co-authored 13 books and published over 330 papers and 71 book chapters. Dr Amin’s H Index is 97 and his i10 index is 307; his work has a total of 39751 citations (data from Google Scholar March 22, 2018). Dr. Amin is a sought out speaker and has given over 360 pathology grand rounds, lectures and workshops. He has extensively spoken around the world and lectured in 30 countries and 67 cities outside of the US.

Best Practice Immunohistochemistry in Diagnosis of Urological Tumors
6:30-7:30 pm
Mahul Amin, MD

Mahul Amin, MD

Professor and Chairman of Pathology, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Gerwin Endowed Chair for Cancer Research

Dr. Mahul Amin is an internationally recognized researcher, leading urologic pathologist and highly effective operations executive, with consistent success heading up clinical practice and research transformations in translational pathology, leading growth, and increasing industry recognition for large academic laboratories. He is an international consultant in tumors of the genitourinary tract and a world-renowned expert and educator in genitourinary pathology having co-authored the 2002 WHO classification systems for urothelial tumors and renal neoplasms; and the 2016 WHO classification systems for tumors of the prostate, bladder, kidney, penis and testis.

He has made pioneering contributions including the first major descriptions of entities in genitourinary pathology including lymphoepithelioma-like carcinoma of the bladder, micropapillary carcinoma of the bladder, acquired cystic disease associated renal cell carcinoma, clear cell-papillary renal cell carcinoma, thyroid-like carcinoma of the kidney, tubulocystic carcinoma of the kidney, intratubular large cell hyalinizing sertoli cell neoplasia of the testis, and low-grade glandular tumors of the urachus. He has authored some of the first major series and descriptions on Succinate dehydrogenase - deficient renal cell carcinoma and Fumarate hydratase- deficient renal cell carcinoma and the classification of neuroendocrine tumors of the prostate.

His scientific interests are in the discovery and validation of biomarkers in urologic malignancies for clinical personalized medicine. He has co-authored 13 books and published over 330 papers and 71 book chapters. Dr Amin’s H Index is 97 and his i10 index is 307; his work has a total of 39751 citations (data from Google Scholar March 22, 2018). Dr. Amin is a sought out speaker and has given over 360 pathology grand rounds, lectures and workshops. He has extensively spoken around the world and lectured in 30 countries and 67 cities outside of the US.

Who’s WHO in the new WHO Classification of Urologic Cancer?
Thursday, February 14
7:00-8:00 am
Mahul Amin, MD

Mahul Amin, MD

Professor and Chairman of Pathology, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Gerwin Endowed Chair for Cancer Research

Dr. Mahul Amin is an internationally recognized researcher, leading urologic pathologist and highly effective operations executive, with consistent success heading up clinical practice and research transformations in translational pathology, leading growth, and increasing industry recognition for large academic laboratories. He is an international consultant in tumors of the genitourinary tract and a world-renowned expert and educator in genitourinary pathology having co-authored the 2002 WHO classification systems for urothelial tumors and renal neoplasms; and the 2016 WHO classification systems for tumors of the prostate, bladder, kidney, penis and testis.

He has made pioneering contributions including the first major descriptions of entities in genitourinary pathology including lymphoepithelioma-like carcinoma of the bladder, micropapillary carcinoma of the bladder, acquired cystic disease associated renal cell carcinoma, clear cell-papillary renal cell carcinoma, thyroid-like carcinoma of the kidney, tubulocystic carcinoma of the kidney, intratubular large cell hyalinizing sertoli cell neoplasia of the testis, and low-grade glandular tumors of the urachus. He has authored some of the first major series and descriptions on Succinate dehydrogenase - deficient renal cell carcinoma and Fumarate hydratase- deficient renal cell carcinoma and the classification of neuroendocrine tumors of the prostate.

His scientific interests are in the discovery and validation of biomarkers in urologic malignancies for clinical personalized medicine. He has co-authored 13 books and published over 330 papers and 71 book chapters. Dr Amin’s H Index is 97 and his i10 index is 307; his work has a total of 39751 citations (data from Google Scholar March 22, 2018). Dr. Amin is a sought out speaker and has given over 360 pathology grand rounds, lectures and workshops. He has extensively spoken around the world and lectured in 30 countries and 67 cities outside of the US.

Renal Cell Carcinoma: An Update on Histologic Classification--WHO 2016 and beyond
8:00-9:00 am
Mahul Amin, MD

Mahul Amin, MD

Professor and Chairman of Pathology, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Gerwin Endowed Chair for Cancer Research

Dr. Mahul Amin is an internationally recognized researcher, leading urologic pathologist and highly effective operations executive, with consistent success heading up clinical practice and research transformations in translational pathology, leading growth, and increasing industry recognition for large academic laboratories. He is an international consultant in tumors of the genitourinary tract and a world-renowned expert and educator in genitourinary pathology having co-authored the 2002 WHO classification systems for urothelial tumors and renal neoplasms; and the 2016 WHO classification systems for tumors of the prostate, bladder, kidney, penis and testis.

He has made pioneering contributions including the first major descriptions of entities in genitourinary pathology including lymphoepithelioma-like carcinoma of the bladder, micropapillary carcinoma of the bladder, acquired cystic disease associated renal cell carcinoma, clear cell-papillary renal cell carcinoma, thyroid-like carcinoma of the kidney, tubulocystic carcinoma of the kidney, intratubular large cell hyalinizing sertoli cell neoplasia of the testis, and low-grade glandular tumors of the urachus. He has authored some of the first major series and descriptions on Succinate dehydrogenase - deficient renal cell carcinoma and Fumarate hydratase- deficient renal cell carcinoma and the classification of neuroendocrine tumors of the prostate.

His scientific interests are in the discovery and validation of biomarkers in urologic malignancies for clinical personalized medicine. He has co-authored 13 books and published over 330 papers and 71 book chapters. Dr Amin’s H Index is 97 and his i10 index is 307; his work has a total of 39751 citations (data from Google Scholar March 22, 2018). Dr. Amin is a sought out speaker and has given over 360 pathology grand rounds, lectures and workshops. He has extensively spoken around the world and lectured in 30 countries and 67 cities outside of the US.

Histologic Variants of Bladder Cancer: Diagnostic, Prognostic and Therapeutic Implications
9:00-10:00 am
Dan Albertson, MD

Dan Albertson, MD

Assistant Professor of Pathology, University of Utah School of Medicine
Section Head and Medical Director, Surgical Pathology and Oncology, ARUP Laboratories
Director, Genitourinary Pathology, ARUP Laboratories

Dr. Albertson is an assistant professor of pathology at the University of Utah School of Medicine. He received his MD from the University of Nebraska and completed his residency in anatomic and clinical pathology at Creighton University, followed by a surgical pathology fellowship at the University of Utah. While at Creighton, Dr. Albertson served as the chief resident for two years and received the Hal Lankford Pathology Resident Award. He is a member of United States and Canadian Academy of Pathology and the College of American Pathologists. Dr. Albertson’s special research interest include oncologic genitourinary pathology.

Interesting Cases in GU Pathology